Conserving crocodiles

Siamese crocodiles are one of the rarest reptiles on Earth. Wiped out from 99% of their former range. Driven to the brink of extinction.

They have a truly tragic past – taken from the wild in their hundreds and cross-bred with other crocodile species to keep up with a rampant demand for the international skin trade. There are now just a few hundred left.

In fact, they were thought to be extinct until they were rediscovered in Cambodia in 2000 in a series of surveys led by FFI.

They are practically the definition of a neglected species.

Well, that is until a few years ago.

Thanks to your incredible support – we are starting to turn their fate around. FFI and our local partners are carrying out a crucial captive breeding programme in Cambodia, releasing hundreds of Siamese crocodiles into the wild.

Our aim is to double the wild population over the next few years – this could provide an incredible lifeline for the species.

And, so far so good. In the last few years we have discovered a wild Siamese crocodile nest containing 22 eggs, and found a released Siamese crocodile nesting in the wild.

This is ground-breaking news – providing evidence that released Siamese crocodiles are not only able to survive in the wild, but also nest, raising hope for Siamese crocodile conservation across Cambodia.

And the good news doesn’t stop there – last year, a team of community wardens working with FFI to protect Siamese crocodiles in Cambodia’s Chhay Reap received a prestigious international ranger award for their dedicated conservation work.

We still have a long way to go to secure the future of these rare reptiles, but this is certainly a great step in the right direction. With your support, we can continue to fund our crucial captive breeding and monitoring programme, helping these incredible creatures to thrive in the wild once again.

Please help save crocodiles. If everyone reading this donates just £3, you could help support our vital captive breeding and monitoring programme, providing hope for this species. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.